From geo-politics to geo-poetics; Decoding the Travesías of Amereida as a critical practice towards the urbanization in South-America

The research explores how through a geo-poetic vision towards the South American continent created by the School of Valparaíso in Chile, the Travesías de Amereida –a collective and situated architectural experiences performed across the continent to radically interpret the urbanization of territories beyond city boundaries– becomes a critical design-practice facing the colonial and current planetary urbanization of South America, bringing new decolonial insights in architecture and urbanism.

This research questions how contemporary planetary urbanization driven by global capitalism has provoked a critical territorial turn in the design-practice and epistemologies of architecture and urbanism, committed to producing new knowledge and decolonial insights about the rapid transformation of cultural and natural environments on territories beyond traditional city bounderies.

In order to explore on this subject, the research focuses on analyzing how through a geo-poetic vision towards the South American continent created in the mid-sixties by the School of Valparaíso in Chile, the Travesías de Amereida –a collective and situated architectural study performed across the continent– becomes a radical experience to re-read and re-drawn the urbanization in the South American extent, especially beyond the large cities located on the edge of the mainland.

By using Historical Archives of Travesías performed from the 1960s to the present [1965;1985;2019], this research outlines how the geo-poetic vision has been an attempt to reinterpret the "American extent" as a palimpsest of territorial transformation. Besides, the research unfolds how this geo-poetic vision is embodied in an iterative design practice that combine temporality, spatiality, and situated experience, embracing new decolonial perspectives in architecture and urbanism about the ever-changing urban interactions on territories, virtually invisiblized by capitalist hegemony and cultural imperialism inherited from colonization.